Our Himalayan Trek

This will probably not come as much of a surprise to you, but we can now say with certainty that Sagarmatha (Everest) National Park – home to several of the world’s highest mountains – is one of the most unique and breathtaking places in the world. Impossibly steep and high peaks loft through clouds in all directions, their jagged sides caked with snow and glaciers. Countless waterfalls cascade down kilometer-high cliffs. The rock and scrub high above tree level is dotted with tiny colorful wildflowers. Golden eagles and enormous Himalayan vultures soar over mountain goats perching on rocky ledges. Shaggy yaks and stalwart porters – both strong and surefooted – haul heavy loads up steep granite and dirt trails. Tibetan prayer flags flutter everywhere and Buddhist monasteries and prayer wheels mark every settlement. Cute Sherpa children play next to farms and buildings or are busy washing clothes in the cold streams. Even when an overcast sky obscures the dramatic backdrop, every scene is naturally beautiful and distinctly alpine.

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Gregor and awesome Ama Dablam

We spent 11 days exploring the park on our way up to the settlement of Gokyo and back. We covered 100km and climbed a total of 7150m (23,500ft) while at an average elevation of 3600m – and our trek was actually a shorter itinerary than most! Many visitors combine a few high-altitude destinations connected by passes and the single-most popular site is Everest Base Camp. As you can’t actually see Everest from the camp itself, it’s more of a “I’ve been there” destination (coupled of course with the beautiful journey, which has plenty of sightseeing) that we chose to skip. For us the views were paramount, and Gokyo offered good opportunities that fit into our timeframe. We made that decision months ago when first considering going to Nepal – fast forward to late September and now we’re actually doing it!

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Elaine and our guide Tersang in front of Thamserku and Kangtega

Day 1: Kathmandu to Phakding via Lukla (2860m) – Not Quite What You Expected

We woke early – Elaine still under the weather but feeling much better than the night before with a high fever – and met up with our guide Tersang to head to Kathmandu Airport. Our mountain trek was to begin in Lukla, a mountain settlement just south of Sagarmatha National Park, and to get there we had to hop a short flight. Because Lukla is perched on a mountainside at high elevation, weather often disrupts schedules and it was by no means certain we would actually fly. It’s fairly common to wait several days (going to the airport each day, of course) for the right conditions. This occurred to many folks planning to depart in the days after we flew, but we were lucky and our Twin Otter aircraft departed ontime.

The word most associated with Lukla Airfield is “extreme”, and whether or not it’s the Most Extreme (a common claim) it’s certainly a fitting descriptor. The very short 1600′ runway slopes upward on the hillside by 12 degrees (this is a lot) and dead-ends at a combo of stone wall and higher mountainside. There’s no going around once a landing attempt begins. Add in the shifty mountain clouds and winds which appear rapidly and you’ve got a very tough job for the pilots who fly here regularly – on busy high season days there are over a hundred landings and takeoffs here. We only knew some of this boarding the Twin Otter (only short-takeoff and -landing aircraft like the Twin Otter and Dornier 228 can handle this runway) but enough to feel the thrill as we departed Kathmandu.

Once aloft we flew over hill villages and green terraces slicing the terrain into neat topological layers. Further away the clouds cleared enough to catch glimpses of some of the high peaks in the Himalayas. Lukla is about a 25 minute flight east of Kathmandu and so we quickly neared our destination, ridges rising underneath us until we were just skimming over some heading into the approach. I never saw the runway until we touched down but sure got a very close look at the hillside just below through the canopy as we rocketed in on final with a heavy load in the thin air. At the last moment – but not before Elaine looked over for reassurance to only hear me say “whoa, shit!” as the green hillside rushed up – and then we flared for a perfect uphill landing. [Here’s some video we took of a takeoff and landing at Lukla].

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Tersang laughed at our white-knuckling – he’s done this plenty of times – and introduced us to our porter as we exited the fenced-in airfield. Meg Raj is tiny at about half my size but was a humble powerhouse the whole trip. Considering that many porters earn their pay hauling up to 100kg, sometimes more, up steep mountainsides for days at a stretch (no exaggeration, it’s mindblowing) it’s probably a good gig to carry less than 20kg for a couple low-altitude folks like us and this is how our guide Tersang started out himself.

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Lukla is an adorable stone-made alpine town
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Tersang (left) and Meg Raj (right)

Day One was an easy hike. After taking some tea in Lukla we walked downhill a couple hours to Phakding, a small settlement before the real uphill begins. We saw our first mountain views, prayer wheels and flags, and Buddhist inscriptions along the way as a warm up, and arrived in Phakding for lunch and a nap.

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This was our first introduction to the trekking lodges we would be staying in each night and we were pleasantly surprised. Don’t ask me where I got this from but I had the image of being stuffed under a stairwell in a smoke-filled drafty room with a smelly yak pelt for a blanket and the most rustic imaginable toilet facilities. Instead, each night we had our own room with simple yet comfortable beds and blanket, the toilets were decent, and there was far more variety of food available than expected. That’s not to say all the food on the menu was a good idea to order: Elaine, under duress to quickly make a new selection after being informed that the chicken helicopter had not arrived in a while, once tried a tuna sandwich which was a Bad Idea. So we got more than our fill of rice and potatoes. But it sure is hard to complain about 3 hot meals a day while clambering around in the mountains!

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typical lodge bed
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typical lodge dining room view

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Day 2: Phakding to Namche Bazar (3450m) – Up and Across

Our first uphill was a big one with 1240m of climbing through the Khumbu Valley to the hub Sherpa settlement of Namche. Passing trains of laden dzo (yak/cow hybrids – full yaks hang out at higher, cooler elevations) we followed the Dudh Koshi Nadi River with several crossings on cable bridges along the way. One dramatic one is definitely the highest such bridge I’ve been on, a good 150m above the rushing white river below (the glacial water is the color of skim milk and the waterway is actually named the Milk River for this).

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Tobuche Mountain

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an example of the ridiculous loads these porters carry – those boxes are actually full of beer

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high bridge over the river (the lower one isn’t in use)

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We were still low enough that the altitude wasn’t catching us too short of breath and Tersang set a slow strong pace, so we got ourselves up to Namche without dying (though walking around the stairs in the town later it was clear my body had enough!). I picked up a few last-minute items and snacks and we settled in as fog enveloped the town for the evening with what would become a well-worn deck of cards.

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foggy Namche from our lodge

Day 3: Namche Bazar to Phortse Tenga (3600m) – Peak Panoramas

This is the day we would split from the Everest Base Camp trail and head north up toward Gokyo. We left early, hoping to catch some clear morning views. After a brisk uphill through cool morning clouds we reached a high point north of Namche where we had an amazing sight – the sun rising behind the neighboring peaks of Thamserku and Kangtega cast a huge shadow on the clouds nearer to us. Not much later we had a golden eagle soar overhead and several other new mountain views – more Thamserku (the peak we would see the most of on our trek) as well as Tobuche and the dramatically sheer Ama Dablam.

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good morning from Thamserku and Kangtega!

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the settlement of Phortse with Tobuche in the background
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Lhotse (left) and Ama Dablam (right)

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We hiked up a ways, climbing 850m and getting above the treeline a bit, before descending down to just below 4000m for a night in Phortse Tenga. We passed our first group of true yaks along the way [video!]. We were surprised to find them actually squatter than cattle (for whatever reason I had expected them to be larger), looking as if someone had simply draped a long woolen blanket over their backs, and sporting some spectacular horns. This also brought us our first encounter with yak piss which, it turns out, has an unrivaled potent odor.

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Day 4: Phortse Tenga to Machhermo (4430m) – Above the Trees

More climbing today with a steep stretch straight out from breakfast. We left the trees behind after passing through a swath of huge rhododendrons, entering a higher region where bare boulders are surrounded by low green and reddish scrub scattered with blue and purple wildflowers. We lunched in a small settlement called Luza and then continued onto the busier lodge and yak town of Machhermo.

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looking back the way we came at Kangtega and Thamserku
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this porter is literally carrying everything and the kitchen sink

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a helicopter flies past on its way to Gokyo
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dropping into Machhermo

We arrived in time to attend one of the daily altitude health talks put on by some volunteer doctors running a clinic. It was brief but interesting, telling us about the symptoms and treatments for various forms of altitude-related illnesses and how to avoid having problems. We met several other trekkers as well as some locals including one who had summited Everest multiple times. We also got to try out measuring our 02 saturation in our blood, which at sea level ought to be very nearly 100% but at altitude can vary quite a bit. Elaine had 84%, Tersang and I both had 88%, and Meg Raj was doing the best of everyone in the room at 93%.

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handy diagram from the volunteer doctors. Sea level is Elaine’s natural habitat; Gokyo Ri our destination; and almost twice as high is where the people who really hate breathing air go.

In the evening we enjoyed hanging out in a nice warm lodge next to the yak-pellet-burning stove, playing cards and learning a bit more about the local economy. We were surprised that food costs weren’t higher than they already were (perhaps 2-3x more than Kathmandu) given how difficult it is to get supplies up to these lodges. We learned that a heavy-lift helicopter is used to resupply storage sites near Namche; that further up from there, all building materials except the stone for the walls come on the backs of man or beast; that it costs only ~$1.00 per kg to fly supplies from Kathmandu to Lukla and then merely another $1.50/kg for a porter to hoof it all the way up to where we were in Machhermo. Hard to believe – and it explains why the porters load themselves up so much for the journey, lest they end up actually losing money feeding themselves along the way.

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yaks come home to our lodge. Here’s a video of them
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yak patties out to dry for fuel

Day 5: Machhermo to Gokyo (4800m) – Lakes and Glaciers

Now we were really getting up there in altitude. We had started to feel it the previous day once we got above 4000m or so, and hadn’t slept as well with more rapid breathing and telltale headaches at the backs of our skulls. Additionally we had both picked up a cold, not surprising. But upward and onward! Soon we had a glorious view northwards of the rushing river flowing down through a valley of glacial till with magnificent Cho-Oyu, bordering Tibet, capping it off. Looking back south we could see the valley we had climbed up through underneath our constant companion Thamserku.

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glacial river flowing down from Cho-Oyu

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Climbing higher still we reached the first of Gokyo’s several aquamarine lakes. The first lake at 4700m marked a record for us – the highest we had ever been on foot! It was a bit mindblowing to think that when we had previously hiked this high we were at the peak of a mountain in Guatemala – the highest thing around with expansive views out to the ocean far below – and yet here we were, higher than that, at the bottom of a valley not even half as high as the tallest summits nearby. Wow!

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We passed by the second lake and arrived at the third where Gokyo is situated. Gokyo was a high Sherpa settlement before trekking became a thing here. Some of you may already know this but I didn’t: Sherpa isn’t a role or a title but rather a people/culture/caste with roots in Tibet and a penchant for living in the mountains, which has made them famous as key members of expeditions.

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Gokyo! (the start of the trail up Gokyo Ri can be seen on the left)
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Gokyo Lake and Pharilapche

Gokyo has three local sights. There’s the lake with a the jagged Pharilapche as a backdrop; Gokyo Ri, a rise that tops out at a 5360m viewpoint, our destination the next day; and, over a small ridge next to town, the Ngozumpa Glacier. This is the largest glacier in Nepal (at least that’s what I read) and flows downhill from Cho-Oyu and Gyachung Kang which are both on the Tibet/Nepal border.

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Ngozumpa Glacier

We had no idea how dynamic and fascinating the glacier would be. As soon as we stepped up onto the ridge above town we began to hear its constant crackling and rustling. I knew glaciers moved but had no idea it was enough to constantly make noise, as if it were alive! The grayish ice – in some spots black, others blue – is covered with rubble, as are the walls of the kilometer-wide valley its carved for itself. It looks like a giant smear of sheetrock powder. Pools dot the surface, each a different color from milk-white to bright aqua. Constant little rockslides and rumbles echo around. Super cool!

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Day 6: Gokyo Ri (5360m) – Day of Disappointment

We woke extra-early this morning with the intent of summiting Gokyo Ri – the local peak next to the Gokyo settlement – in time to see sunrise over Mt Everest and then descend for a nice breakfast. The weather up in the mountains is anything but predictable but we had had several clear mornings in a row and so when we set out at 4:30am in a gray mist we weren’t too worried. Worst case once the sun was up it would burn off, we thought, and more likely we would break through the low overcast on our way up the 600m climb.

It was definitely tough going. We hadn’t slept well in the thin air of Gokyo, our colds were getting into swing, and we had already burned off the rice and potatoes from dinner the night before. Not to mention the elevation – a 600m (2000ft) climb at sea level will get your heart pumping but at 5000m elevation it’s a whole new ballgame. Still, we kept our sights firmly on the summit where a much-heralded and highly anticipated 360-degree Himalayan panorama – the goal of our trek – awaited us.

The clouds persisted as we climbed. The temperature hung at zero C. We got a brief glimpse of Pharilapche in the sunrise but that was soon lost. After a bit over 2 hours we reached the cold gray summit to join some other trekkers also hoping for a view. We waited and got chilly; it snowed a little. We waited some more. I really really wanted to see this view and would be more than OK to wait a while even though I was getting pretty hungry.

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a small break in the clouds at sunrise
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waiting.

After a couple hours the sun was well up – though we could barely tell – and several folks started heading back down. My resolve started to waver. Was it possible this wasn’t going to happen? This was our best shot to see a full view of Everest as well as a host of other glorious peaks – I couldn’t leave without it! It’s why I came! But the weather didn’t seem to care. Another hour later we started to get enough breaks in the immediate clouds surrounding us that we could see an impenetrable wall not far beyond and so after more than three hours we called it off. Perhaps we would try tomorrow before we hiked out… could we even do that?

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Himalayan snow cocks hanging out in the fog

Descending back down to we came out underneath the clouds and got some nice views of the immediate Gokyo area with the aqua lake and moonscape glacier. But for me it only sharpened the loss of what I couldn’t see beyond, what I had come to Nepal to see. Fatigued, hungry, sick, drained of oxygen and totally heartbroken, I cried the rest of the way down the trail.

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blue fingernails from the thin air
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a nice view out from under the overcast layer

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Elaine did her best to cheer me up, and I got some really delicious food in me (vegetable omelet on top of a banana pancake – you should try it!). It was hard though. We rested and recharged. Perhaps there would actually be a second chance tomorrow. It would make for a very long day indeed as we needed to head back downhill from Gokyo as well.

Day 7: Gokyo to Phortse Tenga – Redemption!

We had decided with Tersang the evening before that if the weather looked great in the morning we would make a second attempt, which probably meant skipping some later parts of our itinerary; if it was overcast again we would stick to the original plan and leave Gokyo. We rose for the earliest breakfast we could get (no going hungry this time) and looked out the window – to a crystal clear morning! Elaine groaned at the prospect of the steep climb again but Tersang insisted enthusiastically, “we should go!”.

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zero degree air and zero degree water – this is how the yak do.

The steep uphill was easier this time knowing our vista awaited. Once we were partway up we got a great look at a completely unobscured Mt. Everest (a somewhat uncommon sight) along with fellow massive peaks Lhotse and Makalu. Huzzah!

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three of the five highest in the world: Everest on the left, Lhotse next to it, and the peak of Makalu further away on the right

By the time we reached the summit some clouds were already rolling by but not enough to spoil our victory. Everest, now partially hooded by clouds, shared the expansive horizon with many of the worlds tallest: Lhotse, Nuptse, Makalu, Cho-Oyu, Gyachung Kang, and further snowcapped peaks deep into Tibet. We also had great views of Cholatse, Taboche, and Pharilapche, lesser in height but just as beautiful. Beneath us we could see the Ngozumpa Glacier sweeping all the way up to its lofty roots. Amazing.

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Cholatse on the left with the glacier and Gokyo below

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looking north (and up) along the glacier to Gyachung Kang

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at the summit with Tersang

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We ended up sharing the view with a few other folks we had met the previous morning – we weren’t the only ones to try twice in a row! We shared our sweet and timely success, as the clouds continued to thicken – had we taken breakfast at 7 instead of 6, we would have totally missed out. Here’s a video from the summit too. Thankful and enlivened, our climb down was also much easier and we happily sat down for an early lunch.

This was only the start of our day. From there we quickly packed and headed back down the trail. How far we got today would determine how much of our original plan, which included heading over to Pangboche and Tengboche, we would follow or would shortcut. Well going downhill is certainly a lot easier, especially at altitude, so we made good headway through the now thick clouds and fog. We managed to press on to our furthest possible destination – Phortse Tenga – 12 hours after we started the days’ hiking, exhausted.

Day 8: Phortse Tenga to Tengboche (3860m) via Pangboche – Cliffs and Creatures

In real life we both would have taken a sick day today. Our colds were on the way out – helped, I think, by a solid night’s sleep below 4000m – yet still very energy-sapping. This was the day we started wishing, at moments, to be done with our trek. But instead of a sick day we hiked 11km and climbed almost 1km! Our route took us up through Phortse (higher and across the river from Phortse Tenga) and up over to the adjacent valley, the one leading towards Everest Base Camp. Just getting up through Phortse was a bit tough on our tired legs.

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plenty of yaks in Phortse

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From Phortse we hiked along a trail that wasn’t entirely cut into a sheer cliff but close enough (the consequences of falling would be equivalent). This was the most hair-raising part of our journey, but was well-rewarded. Not far along we had a graceful flyover by no fewer than six huge Himalayan vultures; a bit later we encountered a large group of Himalayan tahr (shaggy mountain goats) that played on the rocks and peered at us quizzically. We got quite close! And all along we had magnificent mountain backdrops: first Thamserku and Kangtega, and then once we rounded a corner, Ama Dablam and Lhotse (with a slight peek at Everest’s summit as well).

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Kangtega (left) and Thamserku (right)

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flyover by a Himalayan vulture
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Ama Dablam made an appearance partway through our hike

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these guys don’t care about cliffs!

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around another corner: Lhotse and the tip of Everest just visible to the left

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We stopped in Pangboche for lunch and the delicacy of real fresh brewed coffee. It really perked our tired bodies up! Poor Elaine was struggling with the tail end of the cold – I was a day behind. But the morning had been the hardest part so we enjoyed a nice lunch in the sun.

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Pangboche’s monestary

From Pangboche we had an easier afternoon, descending to cross the Imja Khola River flowing from Everest’s Khumbu Glacier and then an uphill hike to the monestary town of Tengboche. (Really all of these towns have Buddhist monestaries but Tengboche’s is particularly famous.)

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view from a cable bridge that replaced this one after a rockslide took it out

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We arrived to a new situation for us: busy! We started our trek at the beginning of the fall season so the trails and lodges were sparsely populated (twice we had stayed in a lodge where we were the only guests). No more. Furthermore poor weather had caused a backup in Kathmandu for a while and recently flights had resumed, so we were encountering a massive front of trekkers heading uphill towards Everest Base Camp. All the lodges were full! Well, almost. Tersang’s first choice was full. So was his second. And the third and fourth. He finally found us the last room in an old establishment off behind the monestary. I’d say it was the worst place we stayed but I can’t complain much – I don’t even know where Tersang and Meg Raj spent the night! We survived, so did they. And we actually had some delicious chicken with dinner, though Tersang told us later the hosts had to scour Tengboche for it!

Day 9: Tengboche to Namche Bazar – Chants, Cheese, Final Climb

First order of business was to check out Tengboche Monastery. No pictures were permitted inside so you’ll have to take our word for it. It’s a beautifully constructed set of buildings (more accurately, reconstructed – several times following major earthquakes) surrounded by stupas and prayer wheels. Inside we found a small cadre of red-robed monks ceremonially reciting a reading. They were wearing heavy red wool blankets, because it was just as cold inside as out. Around them were colorful paintings, carvings, and a large Buddha statue; unoccupied were two higher chairs which Tersang explained were for visiting senior monks.

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stupa in Tengboche

 

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the entranceway to Tengboche monestary

We then departed Tengboche and headed down, down, down through tree-sized rhodedendrons to cross the Phungi Khola. Here we encountered some waterwheel-driven prayer wheels and snacked on a yak cheese pastry which was delicious (no small feat considering both the yak and high-altitude baking aspects). From there it was up and up some more, a 300m climb. I was feeling like Elaine had the day before with the headcold (very tired), and additionally, my camelbak – nestled closely to my core – had been filled with boiling-hot water that morning. It wasn’t my favorite climb. But we made it of course and then it was an easy flat hike back on familiar ground to Namche.

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foggy morning!

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$3/charge in Namche

Day 10: Namche Bazar to Phakding – Gloriously Thick sub-3000m Air

Our second-to-last day of trekking brought us back down the steep hill from Namche into the Khumbe Valley. By now we were both over our colds and as we dropped lower and lower the air felt so rich and fulfilling it was almost dizzying. On the trail down we happened to run into a Himalayan monal strutting about – this is a pheasant-sized bird, blue and red, iridescent like a peacock. Tersang told us it’s Nepal’s national bird. Totally unexpected on the brown and green terrain!

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there are lots of mountain mutts around the settlements – sometimes they tag along with trekkers for a while
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waiting for our turn to cross the bridge

Days 11 and 12: Phakding to Kathmandu via Lukla

An easy uphill brought us from the river valley up to Lukla – we arrived before we expected to. And we were happy to be done. Tersang put us up in an extraordinarily comfortable lodge with a private bathroom and shower! Elaine had an entire chicken breast for lunch and my fried noodles had sausage – total luxury. We watched a few planes come into the airstrip and tried to find the post office to mail some postcards. This was interesting: I ended up being shuffled into a small backstreet room which was combination storefront and bedroom and offered what might have been real stamps at 50% higher than list price. If you get that postcard, I’m surprised it made it!

We woke extra-early the next morning to go to the airport (a five-minute walk) and check in with fingers crossed there would be flights that day. The small terminal building quickly became packed with trekkers. We all watched the sun rise on a super-clear morning and it wasn’t long before helicopters were clattering around with the fixed-wing aircraft not far behind. Ours happened to be the first to depart – lucky again! – and we walked out to greet our plane, a Dornier 228 this time.

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sunrise at Lukla airfield
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heading to our plane!

The turnaround time from when the plane pulled off the runway to when it was ready to depart again was a mere five or so minutes. They don’t mess around here when the weather is good. Before we new it we were on the runway, brakes held while the engines hit full throttle, then off down the slope like a ski jumper. [video] Once the runway ends you’re off over a thousand-foot valley with a ridge dead ahead to clear. Needless to say we made it and returned to dusty Kathmandu for a long nap, hearty dinner, and cold beers.

What an incredible trip!

Amadablam

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Going to Kathmandu

The time had come for us to embark on a segment of our journey we have been anticipating for a while: Nepal and the mighty Himalayan Mountains. To say we were a bit anxious about some of the aspects involved might be an understatement. We had heard tales of lethal Kathmandu tapwater and unsanitary food conditions, and we worried whether our soft sea-level bodies could adapt to the strenuous high-altitude conditions of our upcoming trek. Could we stay healthy enough in our short time here to make it worthwhile?

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Some of these questions would have to wait – before going high into the mountains we first had a few days in and around Kathmandu to sightsee (and get a bit of time at at a mile high, at least). Our entire itinerary in Nepal from arrival to departure had been arranged by a tour company – More Than Mountains – recommended by some fellow globetrotters Josh and Liz who we met in Vietnam. This level of service was a first in our experience but as Nepal was both wholly new for us and centered around a specific goal (seeing the Himalayas), we opted for the guided visit.

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More Than Mountains is headed by Jagat Man Lama – with nearly a half-century of experience guiding – and his son Barun. Barun met us at Kathmandu Airport after we worked our way through the interestingly archaic immigrations and brought us to our hotel in the Thamel district of Kathmandu, the center of commercial and tourist activity. This was at night however, so our first real look at Kathmandu wasn’t until the following morning when Barun picked us up for some local sightseeing.

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This day and the following drove home a consistent message: Kathmandu Valley is a tough place to live. The low lying city, with very few buildings higher than five stories, sprawls along narrow and uneven streets, many unpaved, dusty one moment and muddy the next. Immense water resources flow down from the hills only to be quickly contaminated before reaching the demand. Monsoon season makes travel nearly impossible, and earthquakes – or more specifically in recent history, the Gorkha Earthquake in 2015 – makes life, buildings, and infrastructure fragile entities. Financial support, be it aid money or local funds, sadly often gets diverted before reaching its destination.

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earthquake-damaged, and still occupied, building in Bhaktapur

Our first visit was to Bhaktapur’s Durbar Square. Barun walked us into the historic area and then later into the historic commercial district. The World Heritage site of Durbar was sadly torn apart in the earthquake and several of the central temples are significantly damaged, with repairs only progressing slowly and arduously. We saw the first of many quake-damaged buildings shored up with external timbers and still occupied by businesses and tenants – a sight that repeated itself over and over. The citizens of Kathmandu persevere and life goes on without complaint.

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ornate woodwork at Bhaktapur Durbar
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the post-earthquake ruins of a temple with its pre-quake photo posted nearby

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dogs – and sculpture – pant away a warm day in Bhaktapur 
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sleeping man and sleeping goat at a temple

We visited a couple other areas in Bhaktapur including the Nyatapola Temple and a pottery district. After lunch we tried some of the famous local yogurt (I even tried it – pretty good!). From Bhaktapur we headed up into a hillside area called Nagarkot, for a bit more time at elevation and hopefully some good mountain views. We stayed at a very nice place on an overlook over the valley below though but the mountains beyond were obscured by clouds.

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Elaine’s a pro

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viewing Kathmandu valley from partway up the hill to Nagarkot

 

We stayed for a couple nights and did catch a couple exciting glimpses of the Himalayas, and caught a break in the rain to take a walk through the hillside and see some local farms. Walking back we bumped into groups of adorably friendly kids heading downhill from school, smiling and greeting us with “Namaste!”.

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a dawn view of Dorje Lhakpa from our room
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hillside residence with corn drying for storage
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happy Nepalese goats

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Elaine collected some wildflowers on our hike

After our hillside retreat we headed back down to Kathmandu, two days yet until we were to head into the mountains. We visited a few more historic sites – the ancient Hindu temple of Changu Narayan, the huge Buddhist stupa of Boudhhanath, and the busy religious site of Pashupatinath.

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looking at our upcoming trekking route in the mountains
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playing cards and drinking tea out of our new Bhaktapur teapot!
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walking around near Changu Narayan

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this local woodcarver lost his shop in the earthquake and it took six months to retrieve his tools.
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soldering some water jugs by hand

Elaine was feeling under the weather so it was only Barun and myself visiting the latter two. Pashupatinath is a uniquely Hindu scene – this riverside temple complex is where all of this faith who pass away are brought for their funeral and cremation. These ceremonies are constantly ongoing, with different areas set aside for the more prestigious. Barun and I watched a couple unfolding on the opposite bank while on our side other visiting devotees performed rituals for health, luck, and success.

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a cremation occurs one one bank while locals perform rituals on the other
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these Sadhu are hanging out for pictures: $1
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preparing bundles for cremations
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offerings for sale near the temple

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Contrasting with the energized colors and activity of Pashupatinath, Boudhhanath is a massive and serene stupa structure where Tibetan prayer flags flutter quietly in the breeze. This structure, like most, was damaged in the earthquake but has been wholly repaired. Here bronze prayer wheels and mute-toned incenses take the place of neon gulal powders and offerings. Seeing the two sites back-to-back was a great way to get a feel for these two intermingling cultures that stitch Nepal together.

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different incenses for sale

So – this brought us to our last night before our Himalayan trek! And, unfortunately, Elaine was not feeling well at all. Her light fever was worsening and she hadn’t eaten much. We packed our gear with growing trepidation – would we actually make our flight up to our starting point? Overnight her fever grew even more severe and I was getting pretty sure this wasn’t going to happen… but finally, after midnight, the fever broke – by morning she was much better, though of course rather tired. And off we went! Next post: all about the mountains!

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the Golden Temple in Patan